ABM Advisor: The ABM Blog.
Category - Importers

  • Jun 17 2016

    how-technology-is-changing-the-australian-food-industry-for-the-better-14107819.jpg

    How technology is changing the Australian food industry for the better

    It's no secret that technology has changed the game for industries across the world. Platforms and software are constantly changing the market for the better. From improving operational efficiencies to inspiring more accountability within business processes, the advancements are plentiful.The Australian food industry is no exception. Technology has provided the optimal framework for the continued growth of exports, imports, production and manufacturing throughout the country. Beyond growth, digital advancements have made way for a new level of transparency in the food and beverage sector. Internal processes are in the spotlight more than ever as consumers demand to know where their food comes from and whether the conditions are ethical.Clearly, the changes spurred by technology in the food industry are wide-reaching. And for the most part, these advancements seem to be positive. Let's take a closer look at the top three food industry improvements due to technology:AccountabilityThe highly connected nature of today's world means increased levels of accountability for the modern food company. For better or worse, the window to company policies and procedures is wide open for consumers. And they are demanding changes to commonly accepted practices.The recently announced food label reforms are a great example. Consumers demanded more information about the origin on their foods and their cries were met with policies. The new legislation will require food suppliers to label their items with a kangaroo logo to indicate the product was made in Australia. The new labels will also include bar charts to indicate how much of the product includes Australia-based ingredients based off weight percentages.According to Business Insider, consumer advocacy groups such as Choice are pleased by the policies and are hopeful this trend toward transparency will continue.

    Read Full Story
  • May 12 2016

    the-australian-food-industry-in-close-up-14103846.jpg

    The Australian food industry in close-up

    The Australian food industry is in a vibrant and profitable place currently, as good sentiment and positive financial returns grow steadily around importing, exporting, production and manufacturing. Following the ebbs and flows of such a dynamic industry is crucial in order to stay ahead of developments in new markets, legal developments and advancements in procedure and software.Demand for Australian products throughout AsiaThe Australian Trade and Investment Commission (ATIC) reports that a rise in living standards and a greater diversity of choice are two factors that play into the increased demand for products outside of China. In an interview with the Sydney Morning Herald, Tran Bao Minh, a chief executive of International Dairy Products, said that Australian food suppliers need to move quickly and operate at full efficiency to capture and deliver to the Asian markets."Demand is changing fast and consumers are constantly looking for new and better products," Mr. Minh said.The ATIC reports that the fastest-growing food and beverage market in Asia is China, with an impressive average annual growth rate of 35.4 per cent from 2011 to 2014."Demand is changing fast and consumers are constantly looking for new and better products," The opportunity is huge; China has a population of over 1.3 billion, as reported by Euromonitor, and is undeniably a strong market for the Australian food industry. Therefore, as demand for Australian products throughout Asia remains strong, Australian food and beverage businesses should be looking to manufacture and deliver in a smooth, timely fashion.Positivity across the Australian PMI index for food manufacturingAs a sub-index, the food industry has been performing well on the Australian Industry (Ai) Group's Australian Performance of Manufacturing Index (PMI). The index overall slightly dropped by 4.7 points to 53.4 points in April.This figure means that expansion has been at a slower rate than in March, as results on the Ai PMI that are above 50 points indicate expansion and a reading a below 50 suggests a decline in expansion. The PMI generates results from a monthly rotating sample of around 200 manufacturing companies.A drop of this size can be ignored for the most part, as it is small and sits within a wider upwards trend, and the PMI April result was the highest since April 2004. This manufacturing trend sits within the longest period of unwavering growth for the Australian PMI as a whole since September 2006.According to the Australian Trade and Investment Commission, food and beverage is a major industry sector for the Australian economy both because of its employment and its financial contribution. The various players differ in size, which provides the opportunity for niche products and large scale manufacturing of bulk items to both exist in fulfilling local and overseas needs.Ai Group's chief executive, Innes Willox, said this growth is a positive turn for an industry that has, until recently, been battling the choppy post-global financial crisis (GFC) economic seas. The Australian food industry is performing well on the PMI index. "While margins remain tight, recovering domestic market share and building momentum in a variety of export markets provide a strong foundation for the lift in confidence required for the sector to move up another gear. A budget that boosts incentives for business investment and innovation would come at just the right time for manufacturers to capitalise on recent gains," Mr. Willox said.According to the PMI April release, the Australian dollar as slightly appreciated, but the overall drop in the value of the Australian dollar across recent years is the main reason for the strength seen within the index. This depreciation assists sales in exporting and importing, providing room for growth.This is a positive outlook for the...

    Read Full Story
  • Feb 11 2016

    food-standards-vital-for-australian-manufacturing-industry-14106615.jpg

    Food standards vital for Australian manufacturing industry

    In any industry, maintaining high production standards is one of the keys for success. If your customers and clients trust what's on the shelves and how it is manufactured, there is no doubt that return business will be plentiful.Of course, an example where quality is essential is the food manufacturing industry. According to the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science, the food, beverage and tobacco manufacturing industry was worth $25.4 billion as of the 2013-14 financial year. In fact, this calculated to more than half (25.5 per cent) of the total manufacturing GDP and 1.6 per cent of Australia's total GDP worth.It is important to note that these figures mainly correlate to food products exported offshore. However, the domestic market is just as critical, and food manufacturing business leaders would be wise to keep Australians content.There are have been countless examples in the past of Australian food manufacturing businesses coming up short with local customers - potentially spooking international markets. This is the last thing that enterprises want, highlighting the need to establish strong production standards and improving process management.Lettuce salmonella scare

    Read Full Story
  • Apr 15 2015

    importers-squeezed-as-australian-dollar-falls-14096323.jpg

    Importers squeezed as Australian dollar falls

    Bad news in the global economy continues to have a negative impact on the strength of the Australian dollar. As at April 15, the Australian dollar was trading at 0.7599 US dollars, experiencing a small boost from weak US economic data released recently.

    Read Full Story
  • Mar 24 2015

    how-does-china-view-doing-business-in-australia-14101132.jpg

    How does China view doing business in Australia?

    China is one of Australia's largest trading partners, and is responsible for the growth of many small businesses in the country. This important economic relationship has meant that Australia is now third on a list of countries Chinese business leaders view favourably, and business looks set to continue to see economic benefits from the world's largest Asian economy.

    Read Full Story
  • Mar 12 2015

    new-resources-for-importers-and-exporters-14073139.jpg

    New resources for importers and exporters

    Many Australian SMEs rely on importing goods into the country as part of their business model. In recent years, the range of services in place to help small businesses to navigate this process has also grown, from specialised accounting software to support this investment to new free trade agreements with regional economies.

    Read Full Story
  • Feb 10 2015

    australian-rail-freight-continues-to-grow-14101991.jpg

    Australian rail freight continues to grow

    Importers, manufacturers and distribution companies will be well aware of the importance of the country's rail network, especially when it comes to moving large quantities of goods around the country.

    Read Full Story
  • Feb 11 2015

    business-leaders-feeling-positive-about-the-future-14081148.jpg

    Business leaders feeling positive about the future

    A recent survey has revealed just how positive Australian CEOs are feeling about the future, with an increasing number expecting growth in the coming years.

    Read Full Story
  • Feb 27 2015

    what-will-the-australian-economy-look-like-in-2050-14102033.jpg

    What will the Australian economy look like in 2050?

    Australia's economy is constantly evolving, with small businesses that can move quickly expected to be the ones who benefit from new opportunities over the next 35 years.

    Read Full Story

Signup for Updates and our Newsletter

Get the latest news and updates on how your business can grow with the power and flexibility of ABM.

buyers guide